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Trains to Huddersfield

If you’re looking for something a little different, then visit the colourful market town of Huddersfield, which in recent years has become something of a hidden gem that begs to be explored. Its vibrant Caribbean carnival brings in thousands of revellers and the picturesque Yorkshire setting makes staying in the town a genuinely memorable experience. With its impressive repertoire of Victorian architecture, food festivals and excellent shopping amenities, there has never a better time to book a train to Huddersfield.

Popular train routes to Huddersfield

Sheffield to Huddersfield
Manchester to Huddersfield
Leeds to Huddersfield
Liverpool to Huddersfield

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Visiting Huddersfield

The town of Huddersfield is presently served by the Huddersfield railway station, which is centrally located in the popular St George’s Square. Its convenient location makes it a fantastic starting point for exploring Huddersfield at large, with many of the key attractions being only a few minutes’ walk from the station entrance. The station itself is a remarkable Grade I listed building and serves as a tourist attraction in its own right, thanks to the striking neo-classical architectural style. Many visitors to the town take the train from London King’s Cross to Huddersfield. The average journey takes approximately 3h and there are no direct routes, so please use our journey planner in the link above to schedule your journey accordingly. For visitors from Manchester, the train from Manchester Piccadilly to Huddersfield is the best option. Direct trains are available and with an average journey time of 30mins, you’ll be there in no time. Huddersfield rail station accommodates both TransPennine Express and Northern Rail services, giving it flexible access to much of the north of England.  

Public transport in Huddersfield 

Huddersfield public transportation is reasonable, in the sense that if you need to catch a bus to one of the surrounding villages, you can, but generally speaking, much of the town is better accessed on foot. For when you do need to catch a bus, it is only a 7-minute stroll from the railway station. Decent taxi services are also available and are a good option for when you just want to be chauffeured around. One thing you may notice upon arriving in Huddersfield is the relative lack of cyclists and while it is possible, Huddersfield doesn’t quite have the framework to accommodate keen cyclists just yet. Roads can be narrow and congested which has the effect of irritating drivers having to be wary of cyclists so close to their vehicles.  


As stated before, buses in Huddersfield primarily serve to help locals and visitors reach the villages, landmarks and towns on the outskirts. One popular option for visitors is to take either the 183, 184 or 185 bus service to Marsden Moor Estate, a large area of unenclosed moorland that boasts pre-Roman archaeological remains. In addition, there is a wide selection of beautiful valleys, reservoirs, peaks, and crags making it a great destination for adventurous travellers. Please be aware that buses do not run past 11pm. 
Getting around Huddersfield by taxi is an option, although it is important to note that there aren’t many dedicated taxi ranks (apart from a line outside the railway station) so you will likely need to book in advance. There are quite a fair number of taxi companies operating in the town and prices are competitive so it’s advisable to shop around before booking. If you’re more of an Uber traveller, then you’ll be glad to hear that Huddersfield is well covered after the firm launched their service for the town back in 2015.  

 

Visiting Huddersfield

Huddersfield’s compact collection of fascinating things to see and do make it stand out as one of Yorkshire’s rising destinations. The easily accessible area within the ring road holds the town’s vibrant selection of restaurants, shops, the art gallery and the theatre. From the railway station, head directly through St George’s Square and onto the high streets. The whole area is simple to navigate and you’ll often find yourself stopping to admire the Victorian architecture that seems to dominate every building. It’s this aspect that makes visiting Huddersfield such a joy - you frequently get the sense of existing in another time and place, despite the modern conveniences and abundance of cosmopolitan shopping outlets.  


While it’s great to explore the streets at your own pace, sometimes a little guidance can go a long way. You’ll find exactly that at the Discover Huddersfield centre, located in the middle of the ring road. This non-profit company offers seasonal walks to the town’s top sites, including a variety of historically listed buildings and independent shops selling unique goods sure to make for wonderful souvenirs. When you’re ready to explore Huddersfield outside of the ring road, make sure you take the time to visit Castle Tower, a 997-foot hilltop tower that can be reached by ambitious walkers. Sports fans should also check out the John Smith’s Stadium, home to both Huddersfield Football Club and Huddersfield Rugby Club