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Located in the south of Galicia, Vigo is an incredibly lively urban city that enjoys balmy temperatures throughout the year and remains a popular destination for tourists. Thanks to its moderate climate, travellers can visit this city during any month, although the summer months of July, August and September are the best bet for those looking to bask in the sunshine. Catching the train to Vigo is a breeze. This city in north-west Spain is well served by train connections, with Vialia Vigo and Vigo-Guixar railway stations serving as the main transport hubs. For those catching the train to Vigo from Madrid, journey times average around 6h10mins. Some services are direct, but others require a transfer at Ourense.

Visiting Vigo

Vigo has plenty to offer the visitor looking to relax and unwind. After hopping off the train to Vigo, tourists should get set for a whole new world of culinary discovery and enticing entertainment. Gastronomy is one of the major strengths of this city, with seafood forming the core of many menus on the culinary scene. When it comes to cultural offerings, visitors are again spoiled for choice! Roughly a 15-minute walk from Vigo-Guixar station, the Museo de Arte Contemporánea de Vigo is packed with inspiring artworks from some of the most popular European artists around, while the Castelo do Castro offers wide open spaces and magnificent views over the estuary. Those really looking to unwind during their stay should head to the Alameda da Praza de Compostela, which is only 11 minutes from Vigo-Guixar. This garden is located in the centre of the city, within easy reach of the coast. One of the biggest attractions of this green park is its unconventional zoo exhibit, housing countless animals carved into stone.

After spending an hour or so here, tourists should head out and explore the rest of the city. Most of the architecture to be found here has been developed within the past two centuries, with an eclectic range of styles and influences. This city is also the perfect destination for water-sport enthusiasts. Being bathed by the fringes of the Atlantic, this city offers plenty of opportunities to sail, canoe and surf. Those looking to savour the best maritime delights of the city can take a ferry and spend a day on the Cíes Islands — a breath-taking archipelago that's been awarded World Heritage status for its unique range of flora and fauna. As the sun sets, travellers can indulge in a selection of tapas, packed with the flavours of the sea!

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